Skip to main content
Book Your Stay
  •  
  •  
Book Direct Benefits
  • Best Rate Guarantee
  • Kids Stay & Eat Free
  • Free High-Speed Internet
In accordance to county mandate, some amenities may be limited.  Enjoy fresh selections at The Market for breakfast, lunch or dinner.  
Click to Close Reservation
02 - Feb - 2021
(Nearby Event: Arts & Theater, Family)
Where:San Jose Museum of Art, 110 South Market Street, San Jose, California, United States, 95113
A discussion about surveillance and cinematics with American Artist, Simone Browne, and Ruha Benjamin.

Registration Link Coming Soon About the Visualizing Abolition series: This program is part of a series of virtual talks and events presented in conjunction with the exhibition Barring Freedom, co-organized by SJMA and UC Santa Cruz Institute of the Arts and Sciences (IAS). The online events feature artists, activists, scholars, and others united by their commitment to the vital struggle for prison abolition and are coordinated by the IAS in collaboration with Professor Gina Dent, feminist studies, UC Santa Cruz.    About the Speakers

American Artist (b. 1989 Altadena, CA, lives and works in Brooklyn, NY) is an artist whose work considers black labor and visibility within networked life. Their practice makes use of video, installation, new media, and writing. Artist is a resident at Red Bull Arts Detroit and a 2018-2019 recipient of the Queens Museum Jerome Foundation Fellowship. They are a former resident of EYEBEAM and completed the Whitney Independent Study program as an artist in 2017. They have exhibited at the Museum of African Diaspora, San Francisco; the Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and Koenig & Clinton, New York. Their work has been featured in the New York Times, Artforum, and Huffington Post. They have published writing in The New Inquiry and Art21. Artist is a part-time faculty at Parsons The New School and teaches at the School for Poetic Computation.

Simone Browne is Associate Professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her first book, Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness, was awarded the 2016 Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize by the American Studies Association, the 2016 Surveillance Studies Book Prize by the Surveillance Studies Network, and the 2015 Donald M

Back to top